Barlow Family - Haiti

DONATE

 

Loading..
The WHOLE crew

 

Ted & Rebecca

(Haiti)

Tania Grace

(Texas)

Ana & Oliver

(Germany)

Tynan

(California)

Emma

(California)

Olivia

(Texas)

Syndie

(Haiti)

 

Twitter
Facebook
In Prayer, For...
  • the orphans in Haiti
    a smooth moving process
    calm during the transition
  • our kids -
  • Tynan & Tania in college
  • Ana working in Germany
  • Twins' homeschooling
  • the future "additions"
Donate Now with PayPal
If you donate here you will not get a tax receipt. Please click the links above if you want to donate through World Orphans.
Tuesday
Oct262010

The "eat down" challenge

Let us introduce you to something that a new acquaintance of ours has officially termed the “eat down”!

When the kids were younger, Ted used to work long hours & travel out of town frequently, often weeks at a time.  I’m not sure how it initially began, but our original version of this family pastime probably had something to do with a simple aversion I developed for grocery shopping with 5 kids in tow!

Anyhow, while Ted was gone the kids & I would make a game out of trying to see how long we could go without buying food. We managed it by pushing ourselves to find very creative ways to stretch out or make meals of whatever was left in the cupboard, fridge or freezer.  It typically makes for some pretty interesting cuisine, as food supplies dwindle down.

While catching up on their blog last week, we stumbled on the fact that our friends, the Livesay family, have a similar inclination! Tara (who may need to become my new bff in Haiti!) is a woman after my own heart.  She has 6 kiddos @ home right now, so shopping may not be high on her list of favorite activities either. But she admits to getting the familiar twisted thrill that I do, from seeing just how much longer we can survive on what is at hand.

Tara’s reasoning has breathed new life into the activity though…and I’ve been convicted and inspired. Rather than the self-serving game I made up, to make it fun to avoid the grocery store, this is how she describes it:

“It is called an "eat-down" and it is a thing, a real thing.  It means that you take inventory of your gluttonous ways and truly look at the food you still have in your pantry.  Who says a can of corn is not a meal? Throw a pickle and a black olive on top and it is a colorful culinary vegan masterpiece.”

With her usual passion & humor Tara goes on to explain, that what most of us would consider an “empty” cupboard is still more than an average Haitian family would live on for a week!

Wow...our fun family challenge with a whole new message in tow.

Needless to say, we’ve decided to bring the lesson home by reviving the “eat-down” challenge, thanks to our friends. Ted, who has never been a big fan of our culinary ventures, is bucking up to join Troy in taking on the spirit of our endeavor.

With Thanksgiving only a few weeks away, and our fundraising in full focus right now, we’ve come up with a strategy - - Whatever we save weekly on NOT shopping we’ll also add that amount to our fund. 

SO, while pursuing new depths of creativity, we can also:

  • practice reducing our gluttony, (good training for life in Haiti)
  • remember Haiti, and be prompted to pray each day, each meal...
  • save up a few more $$ for our move, and
  • REALLY understand & be grateful by the time the holiday arrives!

We’re also issuing a challenge...to you, friends & family.

After all, it’s a pretty easy thing to do. Not many rules... Basically, don’t replenish the “supplies” & see how far you can go AFTER there’s “nothing to eat”.  

Ingredients needed:  a hint of intentionality, mixed with a little ingenuity…and a fresh look at what constitutes a “meal”!!!

Of course, you could always keep track of how much you saved on grocery shopping this month too & add it to our moving fund….??!!  

Or consider donating it to help feed others this holiday season…

We'll keep this going for as long as we can, hopefully several weeks.  (Ted thinks 2, but I'm pushing for 3) We'll also provide updates on the more "interesting" meals that come out of this little adventure. Please share yours with us as well!

DAY 1 (Saturday)

Not a bad start –the twins recycled dinner leftovers into… breakfast tacos! Yum!

DAY 3 (Monday)

Minor slip – our “hunter & gatherer” went into town & returned with a fresh gallon of milk, celery, diced tomatoes and a package of fresh rolls. We still had to deem him a hero because his homemade chicken noodle soup was so “fall” and yummy fantastic! Plus we’ll be eating it the rest of the week…

 

Monday
Oct112010

A favorite resource -

These are great little books to use in preparing for either international adoption or orphan care with kids in the languages available (Amharic, Chinese, Haitian Creole, Russian, and Spanish). We happen to have the one on Kreyol. It's nice quality, compact, easy to use & it checked out for accuracy with our interpreter in Haiti. The mom who created them is an adoptive mom & this is a labor of love. She only advertises by word of mouth right now. We used ours so that we would have a few phrases to use with the orphans that we worked with on our initial trip. We think it is great for anyone working with kids that speak these languages!


 

“I will always love you.”

“You are so precious!”

“Don’t be afraid.”

“You are safe.”

“Do you need to go potty?”

“Are you hungry?”

“Point to where it hurts.”

“Let’s play!”

“We will take good care of you.”


The Simple Language for Adoptive Families books were created by a fellow Adoptive mom in the great hope of helping adoptive families connect with the new child in their lives. Each book contains approximately 250 translated words and phrases that are recommended most by families who have previously adopted internationally. In addition to the translations, the words and phrases are written in an easy to follow phonetic form. Professionally recorded CDs accompany each book so that families can hear and practice the new language before they welcome their new child home.

 

Special Features:

 

  • Book and CD sets available in Amharic, Mandarin Chinese, Haitian Creole, Russian, and Spanish.

 

  • Created with simplicity in mind so that the whole family, children included, can prepare to communicate with their new family member.

 

  • Wire bound and formatted so that the books can be folded over and used like flash cards.

 

  • Contents designed to be helpful for new family members of all ages. Those who are adopting babies will find useful words of comfort and affection for their little one. Families who are adopting older children will benefit from additional words and phrases that will be necessary for communication. 

www.adoptlanguage.com 

 

Class, here is a flyer on the books that we mentioned last week in class, in case you are interested.
 
Debi, will you pass this along to the rest of the adoption group.
 
These are great little books for preparing for your new child. Ted & I have the one on Kreyol, it's nice quality, compact, easy to use & it checked out for accuracy with our interpreter in Haiti. The mom who created them is an adoptive mom & this is a labor of love. She only advertises by word of mouth right now. We used ours so that we would have a few phrases to use with the orphans that we worked with on our initial trip. I think it is great for anyone working with kids that speak any of these languages.
 

 

 

 

 

“I will always love you.”

“You are so precious!”

“Don’t be afraid.”

“You are safe.”

“Do you need to go potty?”

“Are you hungry?”

“Point to where it hurts.”

“Let’s play!”

“We will take good care of you.”

 

 

 

The Simple Language for Adoptive Families books were created by a fellow Adoptive mom in the great hope of helping adoptive families connect with the new child in their lives. Each book contains approximately 250 translated words and phrases that are recommended most by families who have previously adopted internationally. In addition to the translations, the words and phrases are written in an easy to follow phonetic form. Professionally recorded CDs accompany each book so that families can hear and practice the new language before they welcome their new child home.

 

Special Features:

 

  • Book and CD sets available in Amharic, Mandarin Chinese, Haitian Creole, Russian, and Spanish.

 

  • Created with simplicity in mind so that the whole family, children included, can prepare to communicate with their new family member.

 

  • Wire bound and formatted so that the books can be folded over and used like flash cards.

 

  • Contents designed to be helpful for new family members of all ages. Those who are adopting babies will find useful words of comfort and affection for their little one. Families who are adopting older children will benefit from additional words and phrases that will be necessary for communication.

 

 

 

www.adoptlanguage.com

 

 

 
Monday
Oct042010

View our work in Haiti.

We're so excited to share this new video!! It was recently posted by Daybreak Ministries, one of the Orphan & Vulnerable Children American partner churches, that just returned from their first visit to Haiti. We will be hosting these type of teams throughout the year once we arrive in Haiti, as well as being a general support to all of the Haitian partner churches in their orphan care ministries.

You may recognize a few faces from photos on Rebecca's blog from our trip in July. Ron, our Haitian co-worker is seen interpreting & leading the group. Rebecca's little friend, Lorena is in some footage towards the end w/ a smile on her face. We were happy to see that it looks like there is a bed now in her "tent home". When we were there in July, the grandmother & her 4 granddaughters slept on cardboard & a sheet on the ground.

This provides a very real "on the ground" view of places that we visited previously & basically a look at what some of our our daily experiences will hold. We were surprised at how familiar the street routes were to us already and how much we recognized from our initial trip!

Welcome to our future world..

 

Tuesday
Sep212010

“Sell your possessions and… follow Me.” *

A little over 10 days into our 100 day fundraising campaign and the move is already becoming very real!  We’ve been blessed with our first “support team” partners, we have a growing list of appointments, fundraising events are now on the calendar, and we’re beginning to filter everything we have or buy through the lens of “Haiti”.

There’s a reason why the rich young man went away sad…selling everything you own isn’t easy. As excited as we are and absolutely at peace with God’s call right now, the fact is that it’s challenging to start boxing things up and watching them go. Like everything else we are just along for the ride, but already marveling in His provision.

A few weeks after arriving home from our initial trip to Haiti we had a family call and ask if they could buy our house – BEFORE we had made the decision to list it! Rebecca’s horse that we’d been trying to sell for months… suddenly SOLD and now has a great new home! One of the most beautiful things in the midst of all the change though, came from the heart of a dear friend last week.

In the midst of planning a yard /estate sale to lighten our load and raise money for the moving fund, Rebecca invited a friend over who was interested in going through the house & purchasing items we didn’t need. First of all, this isn’t necessarily a normal sale. Nearly everything is going, not just the “hand-me down”-“we’re done with this” -leftover’s- that you’re glad to be rid of. So, when you’re selling things you still like, it’s always nice to know they are going to someone who will enjoy them as much as you did. That was the case, which made it SO much easier! But at the end of the day with her treasures all home, our precious friend put the new items around the house, sat her family down , and took them on a tour to identify each & every one, requesting that whenever they saw or used one of “our” previous pieces they stop & remember to pray for us! So we’ve been doubly blessed by this family, to know that whether they are curled up with one of our pillows or making dinner in the wok, we’ll be thought of and lifted up again & again.

With that wonderful start as a salve to ease any “pain”, the home liquidation continues. From Ted loading up boxes of our library contents to sell at Half Price Books, to Tania Grace filling her car with home decorations & family memory items that she will be the “steward” over for now, God has been faithful. The moving fund is growing, our oldest is delighted with her trove; the house may slowly empty, but as each box leaves, our hearts are being filled!

* Matthew 19:21 NIV

Monday
Sep062010

Barlow Family takes their motto to Haiti...the journey begins.

Welcome to our family blog...!

After an entire summer spent confirming whether or not God was calling us to full-time orphan ministry in Haiti, we are thrilled to be moving on to the next part of this journey.

For years, our family motto has been:

"Always Room For One More"

It's based on the title of one of our favorite children's books, and echoes God's heart towards us. At first it applied to our own family and adoption. With time it blazed a trail through all sorts of adventure and family experiences.

Since our new position will include managing a guest house, we know we're headed in the right direction. God willing we'll add to our family while in Haiti as well. In fact, we're certain there will be no shortage of opportunities to apply our "mantra" along the way.

So, we hope you enjoy following our blog! If you'd like to partner with us in ministry, you'll find many ways to do that here as well.

We pray that you're inspired here to ALWAYS find "room" in your life for MORE...

Blessings,

Ted, Rebecca, Tania, Ana, Tynan, Emma & Olivia

Page 1 ... 28 29 30 31 32